Hot Best Seller

Art

Availability: Ready to download

A rhyming tribute to a budding young artist.


Compare

A rhyming tribute to a budding young artist.

30 review for Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This is Art. And this is art. Can you tell them apart? I love the way this book uses "art" (drawing, painting, etc.) and Art (a young boy) interchangeably. The text is very clever and sweet (as is the lovely ending!) and the artwork is fun and cute (the dream!!!). Sometimes the simple things are just as sweet - this is a perfect example.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Open up, flip the pages, and let Art introduce you to his art. Energy, inspiration, imagination, and huge-happy-heaps of color leap off each page! Art colors, draws, swirls, twirls, scribbles, and squiggles his creations all with a huge smile splattered across his face! :D This book’s infectious and a bit mischievous fun and energy make me want to grab a crayon and fill my world with color! Pure joy! 2/9/12

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This is a delightful story about Art, who loves to make art. The interplay between words and illustrations is such a treat, "This is Art" (an illustration of the boy). "And this is art" (illustration of a work of art). "Art's art" and so on. A joyous celebration of art, childhood, imagination and feeling completely and utterly free to create without judgment. And the ending is so sweet! Love this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    This book is reminiscent of so many art & children books, including Ish and The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds, and even The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics by Norton Juster (which really is different, I suppose) and the very famous classic Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. And, I know I’m forgetting at least two, and probably many more that I’ve read within the last couple of years that are unfortunately not coming to mind at the moment. They’re all wonderful book This book is reminiscent of so many art & children books, including Ish and The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds, and even The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics by Norton Juster (which really is different, I suppose) and the very famous classic Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. And, I know I’m forgetting at least two, and probably many more that I’ve read within the last couple of years that are unfortunately not coming to mind at the moment. They’re all wonderful books and this is another terrific book about kids and art, in this case Art and art. Art is a boy who makes art. And the author-illustrator has fun with this word play throughout the book. I love how the story shows the joy and playfulness and wild abandon kids bring to making art. It’s a joyous and sweet story, particularly the end. This may be one of those books though, that adults love because it reminds them of childhood or some of what they cherish about the children in their lives, but I think young kids will appreciate it too. As far as the imaginativeness goes, it will hopefully reflect their experience and might not be anything all that special, but the denouement will hopefully give them a feeling of comfort and of pleasure, and maybe a bit of glee too, especially if they’ve experienced the respect and love Art has. This is a truly wonderful book for mothers/parents and children, and children and all their loving, caring, mentoring adults. 4 ½ stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    The story of a young boy, his squiggles and lines and dots that make his art and how to be proud of it all. Lovely and sweet

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sadia Mansoor

    The story of a little boy name Art and his art. No one can separate them apart ^_^ He draws, he paints, he scribbles, he also doodles (Y) All these can be taken as quick ideas to start easy art activities for beginners :) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xScqo...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    BRILLIANT! McDonnell is quite the artist to create a story about Art’s art with visual and verse art. Art, the boy, reminds of a comic character, perhaps because of his shape or maybe from his energy and movement but he is a great character that readers innately like. My favorite scenes would be the wordless spread and the end, which shows a supportive mom because every young artist needs a supporter to help them keep their confidence and creativity.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a fun and whimsical book about art: a boy named art who likes to create art. The narrative is very simple and the illustrations are very artistic. I loved that our girls were able to identify different techniques from their art classes and they were excited to tell me how they created similar pieces of art. Our girls told me that this book reminded them of Harold and the Purple Crayon, especially with his drawings of the moon and simple silhouettes. Overall, it's a short, entertaining boo This is a fun and whimsical book about art: a boy named art who likes to create art. The narrative is very simple and the illustrations are very artistic. I loved that our girls were able to identify different techniques from their art classes and they were excited to tell me how they created similar pieces of art. Our girls told me that this book reminded them of Harold and the Purple Crayon, especially with his drawings of the moon and simple silhouettes. Overall, it's a short, entertaining book and would be perfect for an art class or to help inspire children to be creative. We really enjoyed reading this book together and we will be sure to look for more of Patrick McDonnell's books at our local library. This story was selected as one of the books for the January 2013 - Books about Artists discussion at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    Yes, there are lots of books with children and their magic crayons bringing their drawings to life (Harold and the Purple Crayon, Jeremy Draws a Monster, Journey/Quest/Return, just off the top of my head). What I like about this one is that it's more about creating art itself, rather than using his imagination to create a friend or go on an adventure or whatever. Yes, his imagination comes into it, but really, he's just creating and enjoying it. It's so much fun how Art and his drawings interact Yes, there are lots of books with children and their magic crayons bringing their drawings to life (Harold and the Purple Crayon, Jeremy Draws a Monster, Journey/Quest/Return, just off the top of my head). What I like about this one is that it's more about creating art itself, rather than using his imagination to create a friend or go on an adventure or whatever. Yes, his imagination comes into it, but really, he's just creating and enjoying it. It's so much fun how Art and his drawings interact, how enthusiastic he gets with his drawings. And the wordplay between Art and art is very clever (yes, there is a reason the text is all caps!). I've been wanting to do a storytime or program about art (I got inspired by a local art museum's children's Saturday presenting Henri Matisse: Drawing with Scissors - fun collage crafts with some art stories) and this one would be a great fit.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carson Gentry

    This was an ok book. The book tells of different art forms that a kid named Art makes. I think this would be a very good book for encouraging kids to draw and believe in their art. It helps to encourage a child's imagination. While the storyline of this book is very simple it does teach a good lesson. The Storyline of the book is very simple and just follow a child through making different pictures that his mom, in turn, hangs on the fridge. I would use this book in a kindergarten or art class to This was an ok book. The book tells of different art forms that a kid named Art makes. I think this would be a very good book for encouraging kids to draw and believe in their art. It helps to encourage a child's imagination. While the storyline of this book is very simple it does teach a good lesson. The Storyline of the book is very simple and just follow a child through making different pictures that his mom, in turn, hangs on the fridge. I would use this book in a kindergarten or art class to teach about different art forms and also to encourage kids to express their imagination through art. The illustrations in this book were really good and I enjoyed the simplicity throughout the pages. Without the pictures, the words would not have meant very much to anyone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maria Garcia

    Art loves to make art. Through the book he shows his masterpieces and the different forms of art that he can make. In the end his final art piece shows all of his squiggles, doodles, dots, and splotches coming together to form a masterpiece for all to enjoy. This book is simple, but is meaningful and somewhat informational. It teaches the reader about the different forms of art and that anything can be considered art. It also touches on the popular phrase "A picture is worth a thousand words" Fr Art loves to make art. Through the book he shows his masterpieces and the different forms of art that he can make. In the end his final art piece shows all of his squiggles, doodles, dots, and splotches coming together to form a masterpiece for all to enjoy. This book is simple, but is meaningful and somewhat informational. It teaches the reader about the different forms of art and that anything can be considered art. It also touches on the popular phrase "A picture is worth a thousand words" From the final creation the reader can see, by just looking at Art's picture, his creativity and imagination. This fun book with simple, but intriguing illustrations shows readers how simple art pieces can be. The book only uses primary colors to make the most interesting masterpieces.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia

    I think this book has a very distinct audience in mind (of which I am not a part): parents with artistic or "artistic" kids. I think those parents and their kids would really find this book touching and sweet and funny. It fell a little flat for me personally, but I did really like the use of color throughout the pages and the cover.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diana Thomsen

    Clever little book, perfect for storytime reading about art or drawing. I tad awkward to read aloud in spots, but not enough to interfere with the enjoyment of the title. And the sheer joy this kid feels when he crates his art? Priceless.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Loyal

    This book was adorable, about a young boy named Art and the beautiful art that he makes. My niece enjoyed it very much, as did I.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Love the creativity and fun this book brings to life! Perfect companion to Harold and the Purple Crayon and Sam and Eva By Debbie Ridpath Ohi. Love Patrick MC Donnell books!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Dutkiewicz

    So cute! Loved the short sentences and simple illustrations about this talented young artist, Art.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tweller83

    Super cute.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Haya ald56

    This story about people who love art and creative

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Together with "The Gift of Nothing" the best of McDonnell's children's books.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    A beautifully illustrated book about a boy named Art who loves art. It's so incredibly simple, but wonderful. And relaxing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chrisanne

    Puns but nicely done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Excellent! Cleverly written with play on words. I also love the simplicity and power of the illustrations. My four-year old also enjoyed it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Strong

    So cute!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.R. LaMar

    Such a beautifully illustrated book with creative and heartfelt words. The message is clearly shown and the overall book is pure Art.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abi Reynolds

    I picked up this book fairly cheaply more because the cover caught my eye. There is no title or author on the front cover, only on the spine. The text plays on the word ART - it is the name of the character as well as what he is doing. it would be a good book to use as inspiration for art lessons, as it shows what you can do with the three primary colours.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shane Jeffrey

    A cute story about a boy named Art explaining his art!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ali Martini

    Kindergarten beginning of the year, introduction to art, main idea is about practice to become a better artist

  28. 4 out of 5

    Savannah Spaulding

    This story is about a little boy named Art who loves to draw and paint pictures. The book goes through the different types of art that Art likes to create, and uses Dr. Seuss like rhymes in order to make them flow in a fun way for the reader. Throughout the story Art draws circles and spirals, shapes, trees, cars, and houses. He also paints splotches, zigs, zags, and other arbitrary pictures. The book states that once he is inspired to draw or paint, there is absolutely no stopping him because h This story is about a little boy named Art who loves to draw and paint pictures. The book goes through the different types of art that Art likes to create, and uses Dr. Seuss like rhymes in order to make them flow in a fun way for the reader. Throughout the story Art draws circles and spirals, shapes, trees, cars, and houses. He also paints splotches, zigs, zags, and other arbitrary pictures. The book states that once he is inspired to draw or paint, there is absolutely no stopping him because he gets on a roll. The only time he stops is when he is so tired from drawing or painting that he falls asleep mid-way through his work. But once he wakes up, he find that his work gets his artwork put on the refrigerator by his mother because she loves Art, and knows that Art loves art.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Khinna

    Art, a little boy, creates his art freely and with creative flare in Art. Art draws lines in the form of zigs and zags, scribbles that squiggle and dots in many colors and sizes. He plops splotches and blotches on the page, then with a flourish creates the curliest cue. His inspiration is the paper and his mind and from there he doodles and creates his masterpieces. Exhausted he falls fast asleep and when he awakens, all those masterpieces have been carefully hung on the refrigerator by his moth Art, a little boy, creates his art freely and with creative flare in Art. Art draws lines in the form of zigs and zags, scribbles that squiggle and dots in many colors and sizes. He plops splotches and blotches on the page, then with a flourish creates the curliest cue. His inspiration is the paper and his mind and from there he doodles and creates his masterpieces. Exhausted he falls fast asleep and when he awakens, all those masterpieces have been carefully hung on the refrigerator by his mother. Armchair Interviews says: Art is a delightful character that exudes personality and comes alive as he madly creates his art. Children will love the book Art.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    This book asks at one point -- "Art and his art/ Can you tell them apart?" And when you're looking at the small boy, splattered in paint with his Pollock-esque work around him, you'll be more than amused at the comparison. Art is about Art, a young boy with a passion for art. You'll find many comparisons to Harold and the Purple Crayon, but I think Art is wonderful all on its own. The concept of an imaginative child who loves to draw (and whose mother happily displays his work on the fridge) is c This book asks at one point -- "Art and his art/ Can you tell them apart?" And when you're looking at the small boy, splattered in paint with his Pollock-esque work around him, you'll be more than amused at the comparison. Art is about Art, a young boy with a passion for art. You'll find many comparisons to Harold and the Purple Crayon, but I think Art is wonderful all on its own. The concept of an imaginative child who loves to draw (and whose mother happily displays his work on the fridge) is common, but Patrick McDonnell creates a delightful visual and storyline.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.