Hot Best Seller

Modern American Poetry and Modern British Poetry

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for Modern American Poetry and Modern British Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    The fair lady in the family has been hinting for some time that every time she goes near my bookshelves, she gets into a prolonged fit of sneezing. Finally, in the interest of keeping the peace in hearth and home, I rolled up my sleeves, girded my loins, donned a mask and dusted my books. Lo and behold, in the back of the lowest shelf, where sun has never shone for some time, I found this treasure. It's like meeting an old familiar friend, and suddenly the years has fallen away and once again, y The fair lady in the family has been hinting for some time that every time she goes near my bookshelves, she gets into a prolonged fit of sneezing. Finally, in the interest of keeping the peace in hearth and home, I rolled up my sleeves, girded my loins, donned a mask and dusted my books. Lo and behold, in the back of the lowest shelf, where sun has never shone for some time, I found this treasure. It's like meeting an old familiar friend, and suddenly the years has fallen away and once again, you two are young, innocent, carefree and idealistic! Ready to sail forth, take on the world and slay the fire-breathing dragons! My book is probably older, since the cover doesn't look anything like that. On top of the title page, it still says "War Department Education Manual". I was still in high school when I found the book in the discard box of a bookstore who was cleaning out their old stock. Now, the pages are yellowish, some of the pages have lost triangular corners where I used to dog-ear them. Once again, I re-read Walt Whitman's lament for Lincoln, O Captain, My Captain; Emily Dickinson's I never Saw a Moor; William Henley's defiant Invictus; and John Masefield's unforgettable Sea Fever. Reading poetry is not like reading novels or technical books. With fiction, once maybe twice; reference books, - only when needed; but poems has to be read when you're in the mood. This will always be in my currently reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary Sue

    I'm really developing a thing for anthologies - especially the ones compiled by Louis Untermeyer. His New and Enlarged Modern British Poetry (1958) was the first book of poetry I read start to finish. This one is an earlier edition, American and British poetry (1928). The man is just perpetually charmed by all the poets he comes across, and it spills out in his little intros to each poet. He does criticize, but he always has some genuine and targeted praise for each poet. Conversely, reading his I'm really developing a thing for anthologies - especially the ones compiled by Louis Untermeyer. His New and Enlarged Modern British Poetry (1958) was the first book of poetry I read start to finish. This one is an earlier edition, American and British poetry (1928). The man is just perpetually charmed by all the poets he comes across, and it spills out in his little intros to each poet. He does criticize, but he always has some genuine and targeted praise for each poet. Conversely, reading his intros always makes me feel a spike of sadness. He saw so much promise in the poets he brought together in his anthologies. He read everything they put out, and foretold good strong futures for them. But now so many of them are barely blips on the average person's radar: Guy Wetmore Carryl. Nathalia Crane. John Gould Fletcher. Joyce Kilmer. They faded out of the public eye completely, and all that generous praise and goodwill didn't make it very far or guarantee their popularity. He had an eye to the future, though. At the end of the book, he has some prompts to spur discussion. In one of them, he asks: "It is the year 2128. English is still spoken and written. But all trace of our literature has vanished except the one copy of the volume which you hold in your hand. Which three poems would be the most likely to have that 'universal appeal' which is not dependent upon time? Which three would be the most difficult of comprehension? Which one poem do you think has the greatest chance of permanence a hundred years from now? Five hundred?" Clever man. I wonder how he would resolve the poetry of his day with the poetry of ours.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Dual book split in half by American/British. At least eight versions were published, but not always in combined editions. Quite a few poets are included. This book is listed in More Outstanding Books for the College Bound, 2005, a good source for poetry titles.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Preston Stell

    There were many poems I enjoyed in this collection. Then again, there were also lots or poems I did not enjoy. I think I would take a pass on the second part to this because I had a very difficult time with the British ones. I only marked a couple and this portion of the book really dragged on for me. Glad to be finished at last!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karrarr Razzaqq

    very good

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jon Corelis

    A classic and still valuable collection ***** A Five Star Poetry Book: Recommended for All Readers Though largely forgotten nowadays, at least by the general reading public, Louis Untermeyer's anthologies of modern American and British poetry were hugely popular and influential in their day. They went through numerous editions (so far as I know all out of print now, though some may be available in electronic form,) sometimes with American and British poetry as individual volumes, sometimes in a co A classic and still valuable collection ***** A Five Star Poetry Book: Recommended for All Readers Though largely forgotten nowadays, at least by the general reading public, Louis Untermeyer's anthologies of modern American and British poetry were hugely popular and influential in their day. They went through numerous editions (so far as I know all out of print now, though some may be available in electronic form,) sometimes with American and British poetry as individual volumes, sometimes in a combined volumes. Of the editions I've seen, the 1962 combined edition, still available used, seems to me the best: unlike some other editions, it includes useful and informative critical and biographical introductions to each poet. Untermeyer's selections are in ways dated: he includes some poets no longer much anthologized, and his critical views would probably be looked on as old fashioned by current academic standards. But overall time has justified his taste surprisingly well, and despite the fact that this collection might be considered obsolete by some, I'd still highly recommend it as an excellent introduction and guide to modern poetry in English for all readers. Among the many other editions of this anthology, a good alternative version would be the 1955 combined edition co-edited with Karl Shapiro and Richard Wilbur, also out print but available used: this omits the introductions and limits the poems to the most important poets, resulting in a more compact and focused anthology which some may prefer.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Talia

    This is sort of a survey of numerous poets with mini bios and snippets of poets work...no I didn't read the whole thing, but I'd love to have this handy. Especially for pulling out poems to introduce to students. And looking at all of these great poets, guess who REALLY stands out? All of the bios talk about how each of these poets did something DIFFERENT, but T.S. Eliot is the one who really stands out. He was amazing. I forgot.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I bought this for $1 at The Strand. Not so new or modern anymore, having last been updated in 1939, but still a lot of well-known and some more obscure (to me, anyway) writers. Plenty to love if you enjoy poetry as I do!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hallie Day

    Read as a child but picked it up again as an adult. It is still wonderful after all these years. This was the book that got me interested in poetry.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Hoiland

    this was free at library

  11. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Poetry anthology.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Toni

  14. 4 out of 5

    MLPB

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  16. 5 out of 5

    Krystal Michele

  17. 4 out of 5

    Seth McGaw

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mallory Rizor

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  20. 5 out of 5

    Knis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rj Lesch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Mestizo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Clare

  25. 4 out of 5

    LĂȘ Quang Huy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hanni

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christy Stewart

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve Rainwater

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian Stevenson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.