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การผจญภัยครังใหมของหาสหายคือ จูเลียน ดิก แอนน จอรจ และทิมมี เริมขึนเมืออาเควนตินกับอาแฟนนีสงพวกเขาไปอยูทีคฤหาสนสมักเกลอรสทอป ซึงในอดีตเคยเปนแหลงกบดานของพวกคาของเถือนทีนีเองหาสหายไดพบกับเพือนใหมทีทังทะเลนและเกงกลา รวมทังบานประหลาดและนักคาของเถือนรายใหญพวกเขาตองรีบเปิดโปงแผนการรายกอนจะเกิดเหตุรายขึน การผจญภัยครั้งใหม่ของห้าสหายคือ จูเลียน ดิ๊ก แอนน์ จอร์จ และทิมมี เริ่มขึ้นเมื่ออาเควนตินกับอาแฟนนีส่งพวกเขาไปอยู่ที่คฤหาสน์สมักเกลอรส์ท็อป ซึ่งในอดีตเคยเป็นแหล่งกบดานของพวกค้าของเถื่อนที่นี่เองห้าสหายได้พบกับเพื่อนใหม่ที่ทั้งทะเล้นและเก่งกล้า รวมทั้งบ้านประหลาดและนักค้าของเถื่อนรายใหญ่พวกเขาต้องรีบเปิดโปงแผนการร้ายก่อนจะเกิดเหตุร้ายขึ้น


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การผจญภัยครังใหมของหาสหายคือ จูเลียน ดิก แอนน จอรจ และทิมมี เริมขึนเมืออาเควนตินกับอาแฟนนีสงพวกเขาไปอยูทีคฤหาสนสมักเกลอรสทอป ซึงในอดีตเคยเปนแหลงกบดานของพวกคาของเถือนทีนีเองหาสหายไดพบกับเพือนใหมทีทังทะเลนและเกงกลา รวมทังบานประหลาดและนักคาของเถือนรายใหญพวกเขาตองรีบเปิดโปงแผนการรายกอนจะเกิดเหตุรายขึน การผจญภัยครั้งใหม่ของห้าสหายคือ จูเลียน ดิ๊ก แอนน์ จอร์จ และทิมมี เริ่มขึ้นเมื่ออาเควนตินกับอาแฟนนีส่งพวกเขาไปอยู่ที่คฤหาสน์สมักเกลอรส์ท็อป ซึ่งในอดีตเคยเป็นแหล่งกบดานของพวกค้าของเถื่อนที่นี่เองห้าสหายได้พบกับเพื่อนใหม่ที่ทั้งทะเล้นและเก่งกล้า รวมทั้งบ้านประหลาดและนักค้าของเถื่อนรายใหญ่พวกเขาต้องรีบเปิดโปงแผนการร้ายก่อนจะเกิดเหตุร้ายขึ้น

30 review for ทลายแผนค้าของเถื่อน

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    In this one the children are evicted from Kirrin Cottage (3 of them just visiting anyway) by a falling tree and Uncle Quentin packs them off to stay with a fellow scientist who (because in Blyton's imagination all scientists are rich (with the sole exception of Quentin himself in book 1 ... until all the gold) lives in a huge house riddled with secret tunnels that lead into a wide cave system.) Caves and tunnels are a staple of this series. Few, if any, of the 23 books don't go underground or th In this one the children are evicted from Kirrin Cottage (3 of them just visiting anyway) by a falling tree and Uncle Quentin packs them off to stay with a fellow scientist who (because in Blyton's imagination all scientists are rich (with the sole exception of Quentin himself in book 1 ... until all the gold) lives in a huge house riddled with secret tunnels that lead into a wide cave system.) Caves and tunnels are a staple of this series. Few, if any, of the 23 books don't go underground or through the walls at some point. Now Uncle Quentin, who in book one was writing formulas in his secret books and brewing stuff in test tubes, seems to have morphed into a civil engineer and is collaborating with their new host, Mr Lenoir, to drain the swamp, in a literal rather than Trumpian, sense. The original conflict is over the taking of Timmy. Mr Lenoir hates dogs. This is generally an unfailing indicator of villainy! The wider conflict concerns the local smuggler who uses the marshes, and rather unbelievably ends up kidnapping Uncle Quentin in some implausible plan to thwart the draining by buying then burning his plans, thus stopping ... the swamp ... from being drained? Also, the smuggler is very rich and only smuggles for fun. The central lesson of this book is that if you see a light out in the dark, then someone is up to no good. Generally smuggling. The conflict that I recall strongly from my reading as a child was between the Five and the deaf manservant Block who they suspect might be able to hear, and who is out to expose Timmy who has been hiding in the house's secret passages in order that Mr Lenoir not know he was in the house. Not one of my favourites in the series. A bit insipid. Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes ..

  2. 5 out of 5

    Archit Ojha

    These famous five books give me nostalgia!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This entry in the Famous Five series is really quite dark. The book starts with the top floor of George's house being completely destroyed by storm damage. George's parents, feeling that the house is a dangerous place for George and the rest of the gang (who were staying with George at the time of the storm) to be around (fair enough) decide to send the kids to stay with a complete stranger who George's father has received a letter from concerning his scientific research. This guy turns out to b This entry in the Famous Five series is really quite dark. The book starts with the top floor of George's house being completely destroyed by storm damage. George's parents, feeling that the house is a dangerous place for George and the rest of the gang (who were staying with George at the time of the storm) to be around (fair enough) decide to send the kids to stay with a complete stranger who George's father has received a letter from concerning his scientific research. This guy turns out to be a drooling psychopath who swiftly murders the four children and their little dog too! ... OK, not really... BUT HE COULD HAVE BEEN is my point. It turns out that this chap is extremely grumpy and lives at the top of an island (which I'm pretty sure is a thinly disguised St. Michael's Mount, complete with a causeway and everything) that turns out to be honeycombed with secret smugglers' tunnels. Guess who's still using the smugglers' tunnels? That's right: smugglers. Who could have possibly seen that coming?! Despite the nonsensical nature of some of it, I did actually really enjoy this book. It's very exciting and will surely go down very well with children and those who are still children at heart. It's full of moments that will make you go 'What?! No!!! Surely not...' P.S. - Bizarrely, this is the only book in the Famous Five series (which is twenty two books long) that doesn't have an unabridged version available on Audible. The book is on Audible, but only in the dreaded abridged format. I mean, seriously, who wants to read an abridged version of a book? I'm kind of disgusted that abridging books is even a thing, to be honest. Buddy read with Sunshine Seaspray

  4. 5 out of 5

    Namratha

    One of the few Famous Fives where the wondrous meals took a back-seat! Smuggler’s Top however, atop the mist-shrouded Castaway Hill more than made up for the absence of 'lashings' of delicious food. The adventure starts off with the Five heading off to Kirrin for another glorious vacation. But a terrible gale puts a damper in plans. It uproots a massive ash tree that crashes on to Kirrin Cottage. Four active kids, an excitable dog, a house badly in need of repairs and an irritable Uncle Quentin. One of the few Famous Fives where the wondrous meals took a back-seat! Smuggler’s Top however, atop the mist-shrouded Castaway Hill more than made up for the absence of 'lashings' of delicious food. The adventure starts off with the Five heading off to Kirrin for another glorious vacation. But a terrible gale puts a damper in plans. It uproots a massive ash tree that crashes on to Kirrin Cottage. Four active kids, an excitable dog, a house badly in need of repairs and an irritable Uncle Quentin. Poor Aunt Fanny is in a right fix! Uncle Quentin comes up with the plan of parcelling off the children to his fellow scientist, Mr.Lenoir’s house. And the house goes by the name of 'Smuggler’s Top'. An added attraction is Sooty(Pierre Lenoir), Mr.Lenoir’s stepson…a prankster who goes to school with Dick. Smuggler’s Top is a huge house straight out of history with hidden passages behind panels and pits under seemingly ordinary floors.....all mysteriously ensconced on a small island surrounded by marshes and swirling mists. After a few uneventful days, the Five soon discover that someone is flashing signals from the tower of Smuggler’s Top. Is smuggling still going under wraps of the creeping mist? And who is involved? Is their host up to something sinister? A delicious mystery made all the more intriguing by the house and it’s many unknown secrets. Interesting characters are Mr.Lenoir...who likes to appear jolly and friendly, but regularly flies into a nasty temper (the indication of which is the tip of his nose turning white!). His man-servant Block is instantly repulsive with his blank-face,supposed deafness and brute-like strength. And then ofcourse, there’s Mr.Barling…the eccentric smuggler who has escaped the police so far. He longs for a bygone era when ships crept in, over the treacherous marshes towards the appointed place. Another one of my Blyton favourites……Five Go to Smuggler’s Top was one that appealed to me purely for the entire ambience created. The house located atop a hill,riddled with secret passages……the sleepy town with cobbled streets and diamond-pane windows……the catacombs, where people could wander for days and get lost forever……the squelching mud of the marshes, which was almost a live, breathing thing.....all collectively added to the aura that was Smuggler’s Top. Enid Blyton effectively created a world that I could picture with startling clarity even after so many years. When I was a snotty-nosed kid, I always read “Five Run Away Together” and “Five Go To Smuggler’s Top” back to back. From the windswept beauty of Kirrin Island to the sinister charm of Castaway Hill...each had it’s own appeal. And while I have replenished my stock of other long-lost Famous Fives…I have loyally preserved this ancient double edition; a slice of my childhood and a reminder of simpler times!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This one was one of my favourites as a child and I am certain I have read it about a thousand times. I think this one is one of the few where there is more camaraderie, more family involvement with Quentin being in the picture, and more of a mystery and plot too. This one follows the five as they go to live at smuggler's top whilst the repairs are made on their cottage. They have a friend there who goes to school with the boys, and they all end up trying to track down a smuggler in the town. 4*s

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    I loved the "Famous Five" books when I was a child. Now I have a very different view. First of all let me say they are great as adventure stories. They describe kids having an active outdoor life - and generally getting mixed up in something exciting. This sounds just like the sort of books we should be encouraging children (who nowadays are potential couch/computer potatoes) to read. And generally I would encourage all types of reading - comics, interactive books, whatever. But since there is su I loved the "Famous Five" books when I was a child. Now I have a very different view. First of all let me say they are great as adventure stories. They describe kids having an active outdoor life - and generally getting mixed up in something exciting. This sounds just like the sort of books we should be encouraging children (who nowadays are potential couch/computer potatoes) to read. And generally I would encourage all types of reading - comics, interactive books, whatever. But since there is such an abundance, do we have to select such inappropriate material? I reread a Famous Five book recently and was shocked and appalled. If there's a black face you can guarantee it will be a Bad Man (in this case, a thief. Apparently the message of another book is not to leave anything valuable around if black children are there, because they will steal it. Another? "What a funny little creature!" says one of the boys when he finds a lost child with a brown face in the snow.) What? Google "Enid Blyton racism" and you find lots of articles. Her home town is very divided as some regard her as an icon and others actually remember her as a "nasty piece of work" - a sexist, racist, antisemitic, snob. The sexism is flagrant in her books too. The girls are always "helping mother to cook the dinner" or doing some other little domestic task. Not the boys, of course. All the children are arrogant and patronising to various of the folk they meet, such as a caretaker whom they consider to be beneath their social class. It may be worth mentioning the children's names here. Again, are these likely to click with many modern readers? Julian (a boy) Tommy (a dog) Dick (a boy) George (a girl) and Anne (a girl), I remember myself being rather confused by these names as a child. "Enid", a recent award-winning film about the life of Enid Blyton, showed that her home life was very different from her public image. She was the queen of PR - and very driven. Her children hardly got to see her except in the company of a group of local children when she did public readings. Everyone's favourite auntie - including mine I have to say. I was a proud member of the "Famous Five Club"! Having established that her books have exciting story lines it has to be said that they are very restricted in the vocabulary they use. This is probably partly why kids love them of course! And there's absolutely no harm in reading this type of easy book with lots of repetition for pleasure, as an extra outside school. But there is a plethora of other options - books which are not contentious in this way, where the attitudes shown are far less questionable and socially damaging. Who reads Enid Blyton nowadays? I have a feeling that she is read mostly by adults, in a spirit of nostalgia. I doubt very much whether many of today's children choose to read about the Famous Five. Most will have the discernment to read exactly what they choose. Younger children of course will have their books chosen for them by adults. Some of these picture books may well be by Enid Blyton, who will be fondly remembered by their parents. After all, she wrote dozens of books and there are probably some in there which are free of this damaging potential influence. Your children love her? They are enthralled by her magic? Fine. But what I would say is PLEASE read the book yourself before letting your child read it. If it's inappropriate then discuss why. Put it in its historical context - discuss prejudice of all types, class distinctions etc. Be aware!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    "Five go to smuggler's top" was actually one of the last Five books I read, even though it is number 4 in the series. It was hard to find a copy originally, and I had to make do with a more modern publication than some of the others I own. What starts off as a lovely easter holidays at Kirrin soon turns into adventure, with a large tree hitting the house making it impossible for the children to stay there. They are packed off to stay with a friend of Uncle Quentin's, and his son, a boy Julian and "Five go to smuggler's top" was actually one of the last Five books I read, even though it is number 4 in the series. It was hard to find a copy originally, and I had to make do with a more modern publication than some of the others I own. What starts off as a lovely easter holidays at Kirrin soon turns into adventure, with a large tree hitting the house making it impossible for the children to stay there. They are packed off to stay with a friend of Uncle Quentin's, and his son, a boy Julian and Dick know from school, Sooty. The house is a mysterious one, filled with secret passageways. It's a good thing too, because Mr Lenoir doesn't like dogs, and the children have to hide Timmy during the day. Smugglers, mystery and intrigue are the order of the day, culminating in the kidnapping of Uncle Quentin and Sooty beneath the catacombs of the house. Lucky Timmy is there to save the day, bite the kidnappers and eventually bring them to justice! He has a close call of his own, almost drowning in the swamp, but Uncle Quentin's quick thinking saves the dog he always seems to dislike. A quick paced, rollicking adventure that is still as much fun as when I picked it up years ago. I do love me some Famous Five!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly-Marie

    These books are amazing 💕 5🌟

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    Nostalgia at it's best. Brilliant stories.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Irma

    ... reading with my 9 year old daughter... I've read all these books way back when I was a child and I've read them numerous times. I thought it was time to show them to her. I was right! She loved this book so much that we're starting with a new one tonight. In her own words - she's addicted :)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Palliveettil

    5 stars Adventures always come to the Adventurous-Enid Blyton The quote from this book sums up the whole series! (view spoiler)[ -Mr.Barling is a smuggler. -Block,who pretends to be a total deaf is appointed at Mr.Lenoir's house by Barling to spy on his deals with Uncle Quentin. -Smugglers top in Castaway has a lot of secret passages, and the five had a horrid lot of adventures there. -*See the last three chapter(the whole plot is summarized there)* (hide spoiler)] I was thrilled the whole book and Ms. 5 stars Adventures always come to the Adventurous-Enid Blyton The quote from this book sums up the whole series! (view spoiler)[ -Mr.Barling is a smuggler. -Block,who pretends to be a total deaf is appointed at Mr.Lenoir's house by Barling to spy on his deals with Uncle Quentin. -Smugglers top in Castaway has a lot of secret passages, and the five had a horrid lot of adventures there. -*See the last three chapter(the whole plot is summarized there)* (hide spoiler)] I was thrilled the whole book and Ms. Blyton managed to keep me on the edge of seat during the last three chapters! :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Makrand

    Smuggler's Top was the first book that i had read of Famous Five series which led me to search and scourge and acquire the entire collection! I had loved the book a lot. I still remember the characters quite perfectly. A gripping Plot, super suspense and witty Kids made sure i spent the best summer vacation getting engrossed in them throughout the day! This possibly was the very first of the Novel's that i had read and fuelled in bringing more to my library!

  13. 4 out of 5

    V. Briceland

    Things get off to a cold and windy start in this fourth installment of the Famous Five series, as the four chums (plus Timmy!) arrive in the country for holls only to discover that Kirrin Cottage is not only cold, but battered by wind! "It's awfully cold!" opines sweet Anne, "and windy!" Anne, of course, will make a man a good little housewife some day. "It's the wind," says Aunt Fanny, who is already a good little housewife, "making it cold!" Julian, however, who is a tall, strong boy with tall Things get off to a cold and windy start in this fourth installment of the Famous Five series, as the four chums (plus Timmy!) arrive in the country for holls only to discover that Kirrin Cottage is not only cold, but battered by wind! "It's awfully cold!" opines sweet Anne, "and windy!" Anne, of course, will make a man a good little housewife some day. "It's the wind," says Aunt Fanny, who is already a good little housewife, "making it cold!" Julian, however, who is a tall, strong boy with tall, strong boy parts, is rather of the masculine and therefore correct opinion that the cold is somehow stirring the wind! It's a queer thing when a tree immediately falls onto Kirrin Cottage and prevents Julian and Aunt Fanny from coming to meteorological loggerheads. Uncle Quentin quickly motors the four (plus Timmy!) off to Smuggler's Top! Smuggler's Top is a queer house with a lot of queer things happening in it, but luckily the four chums (plus Timmy!) have a simply ripping holls playing hands of Slap-Down Patience while devouring plenty of hot cocoa, steaming cups of delicious creamy coffee, plenty of jammy buns, hot soup, big and crunchy biscuits, some more jolly good soup, ginger buns hot from the oven, thick and delicious slices of heavenly fruit cake, delicious steamed puddings, chocolate cake, and more top-notch jammy buns! Just when they think they can't eat a bite more, they cheekily raid the larder for a scrumptious spread of cakes, tarts, and even more ginger buns! There's plenty of dog-meat for Timmy, except for the part of the book where for a few days he has to eat rats and lick a cavern wall for moisture. Clever Timmy! Oh, and there's something about an evil ecologically-minded duff of a villain who wants a historic marsh left as it is and who foolhardily attempts to prevent Uncle Quentin from draining the marsh and selling off the land to be developed into a soulless subdivision, thus hindering British capitalism. Jolly rotten commie, wot!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Possible

    Four children and their dog have gone to stay with their Uncle’s friend, only to discover mysterious goings on during their stay. A flashing light in the middle of the night leads them on an adventure to pursue a group of smuggler’s in the area, an adventure which deepens with the disappearances of their Uncle and their close friend. With unsuspecting twists, the children investigate the goings on and get to the bottom of this thrilling encounter. The highlights of this book was the unexpected tw Four children and their dog have gone to stay with their Uncle’s friend, only to discover mysterious goings on during their stay. A flashing light in the middle of the night leads them on an adventure to pursue a group of smuggler’s in the area, an adventure which deepens with the disappearances of their Uncle and their close friend. With unsuspecting twists, the children investigate the goings on and get to the bottom of this thrilling encounter. The highlights of this book was the unexpected twists and excitement created by the author throughout the book. The characters created are realistic and keeps the reader in suspense on who is the suspect who is helping the smuggler’s. The character Block was a particular favourite as the relationship with the children creates a tension and suspicion. The sequence of events kept the reader engaged. The intensity also helped towards this, particularly the kidnapping of Uncle Quentin and Sooty created a sense of urgency and danger to the mystery. From a teaching perspective, there are opportunities to learn about other subjects, for example the dangers of quicksand and Smuggler’s.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Habibah

    Another trip into my childhood :) and I enjoyed every minute of it. The five are staying in an old house where the discover secret passages and underground tunnels (a must for children 8 years plus). Are there really smugglers at Smugglers Top? Who's behind the signalling, the kidnapping and all the weird goings on? In a town which is cut off from the rest of the world, the Famous five must go on a spooky adventure to solve the mystery of smugglers top. This book can be used I the classroom for g Another trip into my childhood :) and I enjoyed every minute of it. The five are staying in an old house where the discover secret passages and underground tunnels (a must for children 8 years plus). Are there really smugglers at Smugglers Top? Who's behind the signalling, the kidnapping and all the weird goings on? In a town which is cut off from the rest of the world, the Famous five must go on a spooky adventure to solve the mystery of smugglers top. This book can be used I the classroom for guided reading sessions as well as for individual reading. If nothing else it is a book which will awaken young people's desire for adventure and get them away from the game consoles which tie them into their sofas. I believe this book should be on the bookshelf of every classroom as it is a very good read. In PSHE / Citizenship, this book can be drawn on to teach children about friendship and caring about what goes on in your community. A must read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vesna

    childhood rating * * * * actual rating * * I will allow my childhood rating to stand,but it is a far cry from how I feel about these books now. IMO, Famous Five books have no place in this day and age. Although today's generations of couch potato kids could benefit from reading about the outdoor activities of our famous friends (in a sense it may motivate them to get of the damn couch and live a little), negative issues outweigh the positive message. What stuck with me through this re-read: racism childhood rating * * * * actual rating * * I will allow my childhood rating to stand,but it is a far cry from how I feel about these books now. IMO, Famous Five books have no place in this day and age. Although today's generations of couch potato kids could benefit from reading about the outdoor activities of our famous friends (in a sense it may motivate them to get of the damn couch and live a little), negative issues outweigh the positive message. What stuck with me through this re-read: racism, sexism, gender issues, snobism, pretentiousness, patronizing, bad parenting.. Should I even go any further? These books were my Bible growing up. Now I doubt there's a kid out there feeling the same.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sylvester

    This was a dramatized audiobook, short and enjoyable, even for an adult - or at least an immature one, as in my case. As a kid, I would've loved it. Lots of unsupervised adventure - what kid doesn't like that?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Devenish

    It is a good book. I liked it because there is so much adventure. I like the way Timmy always stays on guard no matter what happens. Even though he is separated from Georgina, (George) he still helps Uncle Quentin as though he is his Master.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vinay Leo

    The setting of the novel is what sets this book apart from most of the others in the Famous Five series, I feel. Not a countryside, and that's one of the reasons that I liked it. Another reason was the character of Sooty. It was not so difficult to guess the villain but was still quite enjoyable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    TwoDrinks

    This was my favourite Famous Five as a kid. Interesting to read it as an adult and see some themes I’d never even noticed (coercive control, gaslighting - bad Mr Lenoir) and women seen as feeble. It was written in 1945 which may explain it but Malory Towers was written in 1948 and doesn’t have the same domestic abuse themes. Guess what I’m saying is that if you hate this book, there will be other Blyton ones you like.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stephan van Velzen

    Getting too awful, couldn't finish.

  22. 4 out of 5

    ^

    Smugglers, trusting parents, tunnels, baddies with appropriate names such as ‘Block’… this is what childhood is all about. For an adult this is hardly demanding reading; but it does bring back happy childhood memories of the picnics we ate (an awful lot of hard-boiled eggs … which nowadays might be viewed as a cholesterol risk!) and the games of adventure and tremendous imagination we used to play outdoors after reading books such as those in the Famous Five series. I don’t care how good compute Smugglers, trusting parents, tunnels, baddies with appropriate names such as ‘Block’… this is what childhood is all about. For an adult this is hardly demanding reading; but it does bring back happy childhood memories of the picnics we ate (an awful lot of hard-boiled eggs … which nowadays might be viewed as a cholesterol risk!) and the games of adventure and tremendous imagination we used to play outdoors after reading books such as those in the Famous Five series. I don’t care how good computer-generated graphics get; they’ll never possess the imaginative, immersive power of the complex mouldy pong which wreathes around damp castles; or the heart-stopping feeling of slipping feet attempting to climb a rope ladder. Best of all, this edition is historically correct and has not been tampered with (edited) to indoctrinate later generations with wet politically correct sensitivities which didn’t worm their way into urban British society until the 1990s.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Aha! The first adventure away from Kirrin. By now the "George is/could be separated from Timmy" plot is getting a little old, as is the Timmy-ex-machina. It's fun story if you haven't read the others recently, I suppose, and there's more secret passageways and Uncle Quentin getting into trouble... It's more of the same, of course: nostalgia for the simplicity of childhood, plus children knowing better than adults, plus mysteries and secret passageways and at the end a friendly policeman coming a Aha! The first adventure away from Kirrin. By now the "George is/could be separated from Timmy" plot is getting a little old, as is the Timmy-ex-machina. It's fun story if you haven't read the others recently, I suppose, and there's more secret passageways and Uncle Quentin getting into trouble... It's more of the same, of course: nostalgia for the simplicity of childhood, plus children knowing better than adults, plus mysteries and secret passageways and at the end a friendly policeman coming along and admiring the Five's work. And everybody loves Timmy (unless they're a bad guy). I think I'm going to take a break from these books now! I intend to reread them all someday, though.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sunshine

    Wow, what an adventure! Goodness, when Five Go To Smugglers Top they really go to Smugglers Top! The usual gang plus plenty of new friends and some jolly awful wrong 'uns! I had this book read to me...with all the glorious voices!!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    Fancied a touch of nostalgia and wasn't disappointed. Still enjoyed it 60+ years on.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    The famous five are once again in the middle of an action packed adventure. Old tunnels and secret staircases maybe a good play area but it is also a good hideaway for smugglers....

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily Read

    Really needed the comfort of childhood and this was the perfect fit. Such a lovely story and reading it feels very much like a warm bath after a long day.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    My son and I have decided to try and work our way through the Famous Five series (or at least as many as we can find/manage). I can't remember ever having read this one as a child. The story was completely unfamiliar to me and I have to say that it did have quite an unsettling atmosphere to it. The story begins, as usual, with the children all meeting up at the school holidays. This time it is Easter, allowing for the weather to be bad enough for the plot to work. A storm brings down a huge tree My son and I have decided to try and work our way through the Famous Five series (or at least as many as we can find/manage). I can't remember ever having read this one as a child. The story was completely unfamiliar to me and I have to say that it did have quite an unsettling atmosphere to it. The story begins, as usual, with the children all meeting up at the school holidays. This time it is Easter, allowing for the weather to be bad enough for the plot to work. A storm brings down a huge tree onto Kirrin Cottage, destroying the roof and upper floor, making it uninhabitable. Conveniently, Uncle Quentin has a scientist colleague he is working with, who invites the children to stay at his house with his children. Uncle Quentin is to follow on in a few days' time after the building works have got under way. In the meantime, the children discover that they are staying in what is, quite frankly, a very strange house, located in a remote hill town accessed by one narrow road crossing the atmospheric and rather sinister marshlands where sea frets can roll in at a moment's notice. To leave the road at any point would mean certain death by drowning in the marshes. The scene is thus set for dark and mysterious happenings at Smuggler's Top. I was put in mind of Susan Hill's The Woman in Black when reading this and did wonder whether perhaps a childhood reading of this had influenced her writing of that novel. Smuggler's Top, the house where they are staying with the Lenoir family, is a peculiar place, riddled with secret passages, a maze of tunnels where people can be lost, and which run through the hillside, linking one property to another, all the way down to the marshes. Their use was, historically, for smuggling, and smuggling is at the very heart of this troubling and rather dark tale which involves kidnap and violence. Quite disturbing topics for young children really. I have to say that, as an adult reading it, I did find Mr Lenoir's rather cavalier attitude towards the serious events unfolding in his house, quite odd. (view spoiler)[ I can't imagine many people shrugging their shoulders, after hearing that their step son and house guest had disappeared mysteriously and without trace in the middle of the night, deciding to wait until the next day to contact the police and then deciding to wait even longer because they wanted to speak to their friend who was the Police Inspector (no-one else will do). Obviously no sense of urgency here - just a young boy and a friend being kidnapped. And completely disregarding his wife's distress at the disappearance of her son. (hide spoiler)]

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    “Five Go to Smuggler's Top (The Famous Five #4)” by Enid Blyton Another enthralling tale of the five adventurers. This time accompanied by the likable Sooty. Adults continue to be blinded to the sinister intent of the 'baddies'. **** Quotes & Definitions: “It’s the ash! It’s falling!” yelled Julian, almost startling Dick out of his wits. “Listen to its terrible groans and creaks!” yelled Julian, almost beside himself with impatience. * affable (p46) = showing warmth and friendliness. “Anyone list “Five Go to Smuggler's Top (The Famous Five #4)” by Enid Blyton Another enthralling tale of the five adventurers. This time accompanied by the likable Sooty. Adults continue to be blinded to the sinister intent of the 'baddies'. **** Quotes & Definitions: “It’s the ash! It’s falling!” yelled Julian, almost startling Dick out of his wits. “Listen to its terrible groans and creaks!” yelled Julian, almost beside himself with impatience. * affable (p46) = showing warmth and friendliness. “Anyone listening outside the door would never guess it was all pretence.” (p84) * pretence = British way of spelling 'pretense' = pretending or feigning; make-believe. “Does Block wait on you properly?” (p87) * wait on = to perform the duties of an attendant or servant for, to supply the wants of a person, as serving a meal or serving a customer in a store. “Sometimes they [the gulls] seem to mew like a cat sir.” (p88) * mew, same as 'meow'. “Sooty grinned, and rapped out a gay little tattoo on the table with a spoon.” (p101) Tattoo = The term comes from the early 17th century Dutch phrase doe den tap toe ("turn off the tap"), a signal sounded by drummers or trumpeters to instruct innkeepers near military garrisons to stop serving beer and for soldiers to return to their barracks, and is unrelated to the Tahitian origins of an ink tattoo. Closing line: “Adventures always come to the adventurous, there's no doubt about that!” (p184)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    You like secret passages? I'll give you secret passages! And tunnels and torches and darkness. Love it. There are also some almost fourth wall breaking comments about having an adventure, like "I have a kind of feeling there might be an adventure somewhere about!" And queer? Everyone and everything's queer - people are queer, they have queer feelings, and even rooms are at queer angles. I have a queer feeling Enid couldn't afford a Thesaurus. On one page she uses the word 3 times. And there's a ser You like secret passages? I'll give you secret passages! And tunnels and torches and darkness. Love it. There are also some almost fourth wall breaking comments about having an adventure, like "I have a kind of feeling there might be an adventure somewhere about!" And queer? Everyone and everything's queer - people are queer, they have queer feelings, and even rooms are at queer angles. I have a queer feeling Enid couldn't afford a Thesaurus. On one page she uses the word 3 times. And there's a serious lack of food compared to the last one. Anyway, it's all very scooby doo with the nasty looking suspicious deaf person turning out to be *shock* one of the baddies. There are however a couple of things that keep you guessing which are handled well. Pretty sure I hadn't read this one before. Silly fun.

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